8 Ways People from Different Countries like Their Coffee in the Morning

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Ways People from Different Countries like Their Coffee

For some people, it is not a cup of tea; for most, it is a good cup of coffee. Are you are one of those personas who procaffeinate? Yes, the coffee drinkers and enthusiasts alike have their dictionary now. Procaffeinating is when you procrastinate until you have your cup of coffee. You may want to try these different ways of how other countries enjoy their coffee in the morning.

Australia – Flat White Down Under

Maybe you prefer going to Starbucks, or other cafes, every morning instead of making your cup of coffee. Let us say that your favorite drink is caramel macchiato and you have it every single day. You may find it satisfying, but for others, it may be in not. In Australia, they prefer a latte type in a small volume.

They like it flat white, and it is a blend with a shot of espresso and velvety and steamed whole milk. It has been popular down under since the 80s. Imagine all the stories that this kind of hot drink has gone through over the years. It is like it carries the time with it; truly phenomenal.

Japan – The Sophisticated Siphon

In Japan, if someone wants to ask you on a date, they usually say, “ocha shimasen ka?” It means “won’t you have tea with me?” Though, the millennials may not be saying these phrases now. It may still imply the dominance of tea instead of coffee in their culture. However, over the past years, the Doutour coffeehouse seemed to bring the spotlight to coffee.

It already once did in the 1970’s. The Japanese are not much of a drinker like the Europeans and Arabs, but Starbucks also braved the market. Nonetheless, you will notice how there are rare and limited options among decaf and flavors offered.

Though, it does not mean that coffee is not getting big over the Ring of Fire. Coffee businesses are starting to learn different blends to suit the Japanese taste. Japanese seems to be more fascinated by how the coffee is making through the siphon. It is a scientific contraption that was brought by the Dutch to Japan in the 1600s. Perhaps, they enjoy the art form more than the coffee itself.

Hong Kong – Milky Tea and Flavors

In Hong Kong, they call this favorite beverage Yuenyeung where they combine coffee and milk tea. What makes the drink more interesting is the wide variety of milk tea that you can blend with the coffee. If you are a coffee enthusiast who wants to try every single creation, you may try different flavors of milk tea every day.

Well, if you are that big of a coffee drinker, why not? You can enjoy Yuenyeung either hot or cold. It is perfect for any weather for that matter. Whether it is a rainy morning or a pretty humid one, you will love either choice.

India – Flower, and Coffee?

Coffee is a beautiful work of art and what makes it more compelling is the diversified ways of how we create and drink it. In India, they add a purple flower called Chicory to the coffee grounds. It even got famous in America during the Civil War, especially in New Orleans. Chicory solidifies the flavor extraction of the grounds that is why it is one of the most favorite styles of coffee across the Indian Ocean coastline to its Himalayan peaks.

Aside from Finland that poured cheese curds (juustoleipä) into its coffee, India’s coffee and chicory is probably the next thing with a unique combo.

Colombia – Low-Quality Tinto

You might be surprised that Colombians prefer tinto or also known as the blank inky coffee over the high-quality beans the country produces. Colombia manufactures the best coffee beans in the world. Hence they go for the low quality coffee powder. You can even buy tinto on the streets for a few pesos. However, they have improved to enjoy their coffee beans now with the most precious quality.

Spain – Cortado or Café Bombon?

There are two types of coffee that Spanish love the most: Cortado and Café Bombon. The former is a mixture of steamed milk with a shot of espresso. The latter is a black coffee blended with the same amount of condensed milk. It is exceptionally thick and more on a sweet side. If you are more of a milk-based coffee person, you should enjoy these two drinks. If you yearn for the bittersweet sting of the coffee, then this is not for you.

Brazil – Cafezinho over Caipirinha

You may know Caipirinha as Brazil’s national drink, but for the locals, the popular one is called Cafezinho. It is almost the same with the espresso in strong cups of coffee, but cafezinho is brewed with sugar. Brazilians mix the sugar into the water before the boiling process to make the cup sweeter than it is supposed to be. It is the reason why cafezinhos are considered as a pre-sweetened drink. Also, it is called cafezinho because of the rough translation into English which is a little cup.

Saudi Arabia – Coffee with Dried Dates

Saudi Arabia along with other Arab countries mixes a lot of spices into their coffee. Its mixture includes cloves, cinnamon, saffron, cardamom, and even ginger. They called it Qahwa and served with dried dates to offset the bitterness of the coffee.

Saudi Arabia is not the only country that seems to match unusual pairs with their coffee. In Portugal, they add lemon juice or soda into your cup for a twist in taste. Meanwhile, Germany put rum into their coffee topping it chocolate and whipped cream.

However you want your coffee in the morning, it is best to enjoy it whichever way. Savor the aroma and the stillness of the morning. Instead of getting up late and rushing to work, what about you try a different routine? Rise early and make a good cup for a better day ahead. Also, do not forget to take in nature while you are at it.

References:

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/foodanddrink/foodnews/20-different-ways-people-drink-coffee-around-the-world/ss-AAsIHkP#image=18
http://www.businessinsider.com/how-people-take-their-coffee-around-the-world-2015-11#india-takes-it-with-chicory-4

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